BOOTHS REAL OLD WILLOW VINTAGE CUP AND SAUCER [SOLD]

BOOTHS ENGLAND BOOTHS REAL OLD WILLOW TRANSFERWARE BLUE AND WHITE VINTAGE CUP AND SAUCER, CIRCA 1950-1960



Click Image to Enlarge



This High Quality Blue Willow Cup & Saucer was manufactured by the renowned Booths Factory, England approximately 1950-1960.


COMMENT: 

CONDITION: Excellent! There is no chipping, no staining nor restoration and all gold gilding is in tact.

ORIGINS OF THE WILLOW STORY

The scene is depicting the famous "Willow" story that Caugley factories first transferred to a "pearlware" medium as early as 1780-1790 in England. Many other early competitors began transfer printing of this fable to share with the world. Over the years many variations of this story have occurred as well as many variations of transfer print onto earthenware and porcelain. No one knows the origins of this story. It was told in China 2000 years ago and brought over to our country from Eastern lands by the Crusaders.

The willow pattern picture was first designed about 1770 by Thomas Minton for the Coalport Pottery Works in Staffordshire, a factory that has only lately closed down. At that time the craze for Chinese things was at its height and this dainty blue and white Chinese pattern instantly became popular. It was copied, with certain variations, by other Staffordshire potters and, though at first sight all willow patterns look alike, the different makes can be distinguished by various small details, such as the number of apples, the figures on the bridge, and the design of the crooked fence.

For almost two centuries, the willow pattern has been the most popular design in pottery and generation of children have delighted in the quaint little figures, as they listened to the familiar old jingle -

'Two birds flying high,
A Chinese vessel, sailing by.
A bridge with three men, sometimes four,
A willow tree, hanging o'er.
A Chinese temple, there it stands,
Built upon the river sands.
An apple tree, with apples on,
A crooked fence to end my song.'


THE WILLOW LEGEND

There was once a Mandarin who had a beautiful daughter, Koong-se. He employed a secretary, Chang who, while he was attending to his master's accounts, fell in love with Koong-se, much to the anger of the Mandarin, who regarded the secretary as unworthy of his daughter.

The secretary was banished and a fence constructed around the gardens of the Mandarin's estate so that Chang could not see his daughter and Koong-se could only walk in the gardens and to the water's edge. One day a shell fitted with sails containing a poem, and a bead which Koong-se had given to Chang, floated to the water's edge. Koong-se knew that her lover was not far away.

She was soon dismayed to learn that she had been betrothed to Ta-jin, a noble warrior Duke. She was full of despair when it was announced that her future husband, the noble Duke, was arriving, bearing a gift of jewels to celebrate his betrothal.

However, after the banquet, borrowing the robes of a servant, Chang passed through the guests unseen and came to Koong-se's room. They embraced and vowed to run away together. The Mandarin, the Duke, the guests, and all the servants had drunk so much wine that the couple almost got away without detection, but Koong-se's father saw her at the last minute and gave chase across the bridge.

The couple escaped and stayed with the maid that Koong-se's father had dismissed for conspiring with the lovers. Koong-se had given the casket of jewels to Chang and the Mandarin, who was also a magistrate, swore that he would use the jewels as a pretext to execute Chang when he caught him.

One night the Mandarin's spies reported that a man was hiding in a house by the river and the Mandarin's guards raided the house. But Chang had jumped into the ragging torrent and Koong-se thought that he had drowned. Some days later the guards returned to search the house again. While Koong-se's maid talked to them, Chang came by boat to the window and took Koong-se away to safety.

They settled on a distant island, and over the years Chang became famous for his writings. This was to prove his undoing. The Mandarin heard about him and sent guards to destroy him. Chang was put to the sword and Koong-se set fire to the house while she was still inside.

Thus they both perished and the gods, touched by their love, immortalized them as two doves, eternally flying together in the sky.


ITEM NUMBER: PFTP000969
PRICE: $35.00

BUY THIS ITEM

To purchase this item, please make note of the Item Number: PFTP000969 and contact us using our order form or call us at 1-416-535-3883.


Click Image to Enlarge



Featured Products

LEEDSWARE KING GEO. III & IV ANTIQUE ROYALTY CREAMER

LEEDS WARE, QUEENSWARE, CREAMWARE OR PEARLWARE KING GEORGE III & KING GEORGE IV ROYALTY CREAMER,...

ENGLISH TRIPLE DEPOSIT ANTIQUE SILVER PLATE OVAL TRAY

English Late Victorian Triple Deposit Antique Silverplate Handled Oval Tray 24" Length X 15" Width...

ROOKWOOD ARTS & CRAFTS ANTIQUE TILE IN SECESSION MVT. BRONZE FRAME

ROOKWOOD AMERICAN ARTS & CRAFTS ANTIQUE POTTERY TILE PRIMROSE DESIGN IN SECESSION MOVEMENT BRONZE...

Antique & Vintage Furniture

VINTAGE PINE CORNER DISPLAY CABINET [SOLD]

VINTAGE CORNER DISPLAY CABINET

This vintage pine corner display cabinet dates approximately 1970-1980.

ETHAN ALLEN VINTAGE ROUND MAPLE DINING ROOM TABLE [SOLD]

This vintage solid maple dining room table was manufactured by the famous Ethan Allen Furniture...

Antique & Vintage Lighting

EDWARDIAN BRONZED PATINA ANTIQUE METAL CHANDELIER [SOLD]

This 5-arm metal chandelier was manufactured during the late Victorian-Edwardian era.

FEDERAL STYLE 8 ARM VINTAGE BRASS CHANDELIER [SOLD]

Colonial-Federal style 8 Arm Solid Brass Chandelier, Circa 1960-1980

© Passionforthepastantiques.com
1646 Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M6R 1B2
Phone:416-535-3883

Privacy Policy | Terms Of Use | Site Map

By accessing this site, or by using any of its features or services, you confirm your
agreement with and acceptance of the Terms of Service for this web site.